Hunting Equipment Honolulu HI

Local resource for hunting equipment in Honolulu. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to hunting stores, hunting knives, knife stores, hunting gear, rifles, bows, arrows and outdoor equipment, as well as advice and content on hunting and hunting products.

Magnum Firearms
(808) 597-1911
940 Queen St.
Honolulu, HI
 
Security Equipment Corporation
(808) 589-0911
1322 Young St Ste 100
Honolulu, HI
 
Young Guns
(808) 833-4867
2885 Paa St Ste 100
Honolulu, HI
 
Kaneohe Gun Shop
(808) 247-3036
45-1117 Kamehameha Hwy Ste 202
Kaneohe, HI
 
G & M Enterprises
808775094
67-2399 Mamalahoa Hwy
Kamuela, HI
 
Mel Chung Gunsmith-Shop 2
(808) 553-5888
Kaunanakai
Honolulu, HI
 
Young Guns
(808) 833-4867
2885 Paa Street Suite 100
Honolulu, HI
 
Avant Garde Collectible Firearms
808373573
5531 Kalanianaoli Hwy
Hono, HI
 
Kaneohe Gun Shop
(808) 247-3036
45-1117 Kamehameha Highway Suite 202
Kaneohe, HI
 
Volcano Store Inc, The
808967721
19 4005 Haunani Rd
Volcano, HI
 

Choosing the Right Knife for Deer Hunting - Part Two

Choosing the Right Knife for Deer Hunting - Part Two
December 01, 2009
by  Al Cambronne
Editor's Note: Eric Fromm and Al Cambronne are the authors of Gut It. Cut It. Cook It.: The Deer Hunter’s Guide to Processing and Preparing Venison . In their chapter on “Gearing Up and Getting Ready,” they write about choosing the right knife for deer hunting. They don’t write about choosing a knife that makes just the right statement when it’s seen on your belt. Instead, they write about choosing a practical tool that gets the job done. In the same chapter, they describe the knives you’ll need back home when it’s time to finish the job.

For this guest article, we asked Al to sum up the practical knife-shopping advice he and Eric offer in
Gut It. Cut It. Cook It . See if you agree with their conclusions.

Guthooks, Gadgets, and Gimmicks




You may have noticed none of the knives in this photo have a guthook built into the back of the blade. This feature has become quite popular in recent years; we’re guessing that more hunting knives are now being sold with guthooks than without them.

In theory, this feature makes it easier for you to slit the abdominal wall and perform certain other field-dressing cuts. It’s also meant to reduce the risk that you’ll accidentally puncture the internal organs during these steps.

In practice, however, the steps during which a guthook would be helpful are relatively easy; when you’re field-dressing a deer, you’ll probably spend more of your time on steps during which a guthook actually makes the job harder.

Later, when you’re working inside the deer’s abdominal cavity, a guthook on the back of the blade would get in your way and make the job more awkward. Plus, guthooks can be awkward to sharpen, and some designs are easily clogged with hair or bits of skin.

For all these reasons, we’re not wild about knives with guthooks. But some hunters swear by them; it’s all a matter of personal preference. If you like, give one a try.

Or, if you’d just like to experiment with the whole concept, you could try one of the separate tools made just for this purpose. Some even come with replaceable blades that you won’t need to sharpen. These inexpensive, utilitarian tools are a lot less exciting than a new knife. But they only weigh a couple ounces, and they offer all the advantages of a guthook with none of the disadvantages. Bring one of these and your knife, and you’ll be set.



There’s one more small tool that we recommend very highly. Again, it’s not expensive or glamorous. But you’ll find that it comes in handy when you’re field-dressing your deer. It’s available from a couple of manufacturers; it’s variously known as a “sternum saw” or a “pelvic saw.”

These small T-handled saws are specially d...

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Choosing the Right Knife for Deer Hunting--Part One

Choosing the Right Knife for Deer Hunting – Part One
November 16, 2009
by  Al Cambronne
Editor's Note: Eric Fromm and Al Cambronne are the authors of Gut It. Cut It. Cook It.: The Deer Hunter’s Guide to Processing and Preparing Venison . In their chapter on “Gearing Up and Getting Ready,” they write about choosing the right knife for deer hunting. They don’t write about choosing a knife that makes just the right statement when it’s seen on your belt. Instead, they write about choosing a practical tool that gets the job done. In the same chapter, they describe the knives you’ll need back home when it’s time to finish the job.

For this guest article, we asked Al to sum up the practical knife-shopping advice he and Eric offer in
Gut It. Cut It. Cook It . See if you agree with their conclusions.

Why Bigger Isn’t Better

For deer hunting, bigger isn’t better. You don’t need a giant, 10-inch bowie knife to quarter an elk or moose, and you definitely don’t need one to field-dress a 100-pound whitetail. The truth is, even Jim Bowie wouldn’t have used a bowie knife to field-dress a deer. Back then, frontiersmen carried a small sheath knife for everyday use. That smaller knife would have been the right tool for the job.

And by the way…  The only reason those guys didn’t just carry folding knives is that sturdy, reliable ones didn’t yet exist. If they had, one would have been in every pocket.

If hunters carried a larger knife (and most of them didn’t), it was as a weapon—sort of an emergency back-up they could use after they’d fired their one shot from a muzzleloader. For more utilitarian purposes, they may have also carried a hatchet or a small axe.



Your situation, fortunately, is a little different. Even if you’re hunting with a muzzleloader, and even if you’re bowhunting and almost out of arrows, you’ll probably have time to climb a tree if you’re simultaneously charged by an entire herd of enraged deer.

You don’t need a 10-inch blade; even a five-inch blade is far larger than you’ll need for field-dressing a deer. In fact, you’ll do much better with a blade that’s between 2½” and 3¾” in length. Maybe you’re a little dubious about a 2½” blade like the one on, say, a Buck Mini Alpha. If so, we hope we can at least convince you to stay under 4”.

A smaller blade gives you much more control and precision; that’s one reason why surgeons generally use scalpels rather than bowie knives. Using a larger blade only increases the chance that you’ll cut something you don’t want to cut. Potentially, that includes your own fingers.

A larger blade is also much more difficult to maneuver inside the deer’s body cavity when you’re reaching in to trim the diaphragm fre...

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